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1867 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar1867
MDCCCLXVII
Ab urbe condita2620
Armenian calendar1316
ԹՎ ՌՅԺԶ
Assyrian calendar6617
Bahá'í calendar23–24
Balinese saka calendar1788–1789
Bengali calendar1274
Berber calendar2817
British Regnal year30 Vict. 1 – 31 Vict. 1
Buddhist calendar2411
Burmese calendar1229
Byzantine calendar7375–7376
Chinese calendar丙寅(Fire Tiger)
4563 or 4503
    — to —
丁卯年 (Fire Rabbit)
4564 or 4504
Coptic calendar1583–1584
Discordian calendar3033
Ethiopian calendar1859–1860
Hebrew calendar5627–5628
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat1923–1924
 - Shaka Samvat1788–1789
 - Kali Yuga4967–4968
Holocene calendar11867
Igbo calendar867–868
Iranian calendar1245–1246
Islamic calendar1283–1284
Japanese calendarKeiō 3
(慶応3年)
Javanese calendar1795–1796
Julian calendarGregorian minus 12 days
Korean calendar4200
Minguo calendar45 before ROC
民前45年
Nanakshahi calendar399
Thai solar calendar2409–2410
Tibetan calendar阳火虎年
(male Fire-Tiger)
1993 or 1612 or 840
    — to —
阴火兔年
(female Fire-Rabbit)
1994 or 1613 or 841

1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1867th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 867th year of the , the 67th year of the , and the 8th year of the decade. As of the start of 1867, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

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Events[]

January–March[]

File:CovingtonKY JARoeblingBridge.jpg

January 1: Roebling's is the longest suspension bridge.

File:SuezCanalKantara.jpg

February 17: Suez Canal in use.

File:Alaska Purchase (hi-res).jpg

March 30: Alaska bought by check.

  • January 1 – The Covington–Cincinnati Suspension Bridge opens between Cincinnati, Ohio and Covington, Kentucky in the United States, becoming the longest single-span bridge in the world. It will be renamed after its designer, John A. Roebling, in 1983.
  • January 8African-American men are granted the right to vote in the District of Columbia.
  • January 11Benito Juárez becomes Mexican president again.
  • January 30Emperor Kōmei of Japan dies suddenly, age 36, leaving his 14-year-old son to succeed as Emperor Meiji.
  • January 31Maronite nationalist leader Youssef Bey Karam leaves Lebanon aboard a French ship for Algeria.
  • February 3Shogun Tokugawa Yoshinobu abdicates, and the late Emperor Kōmei's son, Prince Mutsuhito becomes Emperor Meiji of Japan in a brief ceremony in Kyoto, ending the Late Tokugawa shogunate.
  • February 7West Virginia University is established in Morgantown, West Virginia.
  • February 13Covering of the Senne in Brussels begins.[1]
  • February 15 – First performance of Johann Strauss II's waltz "The Blue Danube" (An der schönen blauen Donau) at a concert of the Vienna Men's Choral Association. Strauss adapts it into its popular purely orchestral version for the International Exposition in Paris later this year.
  • February 17 – The first ship passes through the Suez Canal.
  • February 19Battle of Inlon River in Hubei, China.
  • February 28 – After almost 20 years (1848), the United States Congress forbids taxpayer funding of diplomatic envoys to the Holy See (Vatican) and breaks off relations. Funding resumes along with relations in 1984.
  • March – The University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign is established (opened one year later).
  • March 1Nebraska is admitted as the 37th U.S. state.
  • March 5Fenian Rising in Ireland.[2]
  • March 16 – An article by Joseph Lister, outlining the discovery of antiseptic surgery, is first published in The Lancet.
  • March 23William III of the Netherlands accepts an offer of 5,000,000 guilders from Napoleon III for the sale of Luxembourg, leading to the Luxembourg Crisis.
  • March 29 – The British North America Act receives royal assent, forming the Dominion of Canada in an event known as the Confederation. This unites the Province of Canada (Quebec and Ontario), New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia on July 1. Ottawa becomes the capital, and John A. Macdonald becomes the Dominion's first prime minister.
  • March 30Alaska is purchased for $7.2 million from Alexander II of Russia, about 2 cent/acre ($4.19/km²), by United States Secretary of State William H. Seward. The news media call this "Seward's Folly".

April–June[]

  • April 1 – The Strait Settlement of Singapore, formerly ruled from Calcutta, becomes a Crown colony under the jurisdiction of the Colonial Office in London.
  • April 28 – I.C. Sorosis, the first women's fraternity (sorority) founded upon the men's fraternity model, with Pi Beta Phi as its motto, is founded at Monmouth College in Monmouth, Illinois. In 1888, the motto becomes the name of the organization.
  • May 7Alfred Nobel patents dynamite in the United Kingdom.[3][4]
  • May 11
    • Treaty of London: the great powers of Europe reaffirm the neutrality of Luxembourg, ending the Luxembourg Crisis. The Duchy of Limburg is formally re-incorporated into the Kingdom of the Netherlands.
    • First public performance of Cox and Box by Francis Burnand and Arthur Sullivan, at the Adelphi Theatre, London.
  • May 29
    • The Austro-Hungarian Compromise (called Ausgleich in German or kiegyezés in Hungarian ("the Compromise")) is born through Act 12, which establishes the Austro-Hungarian Empire; on June 8 Emperor Francis Joseph of Austria is crowned King of Hungary.
    • Canadian Confederation: Queen Victoria signs the British North America Act, creating the Dominion of Canada with effect from July 1.[5]
  • June 8 – Architect Frank Lloyd Wright is born in Richland Center, Wisconsin.
  • June 15 – The Atlantic Cable Quartz Lode gold mine is named in Montana.
  • June 19 – A firing squad executes Emperor Maximilian of Mexico.

July–September[]

  • July – The Reverend Thomas Baker, a Wesleyan Methodist missionary (b. in Playden, East Sussex, England) is cooked and eaten by Navatusila tribespeople at Nabutautau on Fiji, together with eight of his local followers, the last missionary in that country to suffer cannibalism.
  • July 1
    • Canadian Confederation: British North America Act of 29 March comes into force, creating the Dominion of Canada, the first independent dominion in the British Empire.
    • Constitution of the North German Confederation comes into effect, creating a confederation of states under the leadership of Prussia and Otto von Bismarck.
  • July 9Queen's Park F.C., the oldest association football league team in Scotland, is founded.
  • July 15 – France declared Cambodia's independence from Siam, Cambodia becomes a protectorate of France and England.
  • July 17 – In Boston, Massachusetts, the Harvard School of Dental Medicine is established as the first dental school in the United States.
  • July 18The Battle of Fandane-Thiouthioune a religious war between the Serer people and the Muslim Marabouts of Senegambia.
  • August 7-September 20 – The first Canadian elections sees John A. Macdonald's Conservatives elected to government
  • August 15Benjamin Disraeli's Second Reform Act enfranchises many men in cities for the first time and adds 938,000 to an electorate of 1,057,000 in England and Wales.[6]
  • September 2Emperor Meiji of Japan marries Empress Shōken (née Masako Ichijō). The Empress consort is thereafter known as Lady Haruko.
  • September 4 – The Sheffield Wednesday F.C. is founded at the Adelphi Hotel in Sheffield.
  • September 14 – The first volume of Das Kapital (later translated into English as Capital) is published by Karl Marx.
  • September 15The Dynamikos Sheta-Maat Spellbook: A book of the powerful hidden truth, a grimoire by Ciara Sullivan, is published to widespread displeasure.
  • September 30 – The United States takes control of Midway Island.

October–December[]

File:Europe 1867 map en.png

Europe in 1867, after the forming of the North German Confederation, the Italian unification (with the exception of the Roman part of the Papal States) and the Austro-Hungarian Compromise.

  • October 21Manifest destinyMedicine Lodge Treaty: Near Medicine Lodge Creek, Kansas, a landmark treaty is signed by southern Great Plains Indian leaders. The treaty requires Native American Plains tribes to relocate to a reservation in western Oklahoma.
  • October 27Giuseppe Garibaldi's troops march into Rome.
  • November 9 – The last shogun of Japan, Tokugawa Yoshinobu, tenders his resignation to Emperor Meiji.
  • November 23 – The so-called Manchester Martyrs are hanged in Manchester, England for the murder of a policeman whilst attempting to rescue two members of the Irish Republican Brotherhood from jail.
  • December 2 – In a New York City theater, British author Charles Dickens gives his first public reading in the United States.
  • December 18Angola Horror Buffalo, New York-area train wreck: The fiery death of 49 people led John D. Rockefeller to develop and sell his Mineral Seal 300 °F Fire-Tested Burning Oil and George Westinghouse to invent the railway air brake, which was mandated in the United States in 1893.[7]

Date unknown[]

  • Pierre Michaux invents the front wheel-driven velocipede, the first mass-produced bicycle.
  • Yellow fever kills 3,093 in New Orleans.
  • South African diamond fields are discovered.
  • The Prohibition National Committee is formed in the United States.
  • The Wasps Rugby Football Club is formed in Middlesex, England.
  • At Fountain Point, Michigan, an artesian water spring begins to gush continuously.
  • 1867–1873 – Chinese, Scandinavian and Irish immigrants lay 30,000 miles (48,000 km) of railroad tracks in the USA.
  • Clarke School for the Deaf in Western Massachusetts opens its doors for the first time, becoming the first school for the deaf in the United States to teach its children how to communicate using the "oral method".
  • The modern rose is born, with the introduction of Rosa 'La France' by Template:Interlanguage link multi (1803–1882).[8][9]
  • Gorse is naturalised in New Zealand, where it soon becomes the worst invasive weed.
  • The Famine of 1866–68 reach Sweden.

Ongoing[]

  • Paraguayan War.

Births[]

January–March[]

File:CarlLaemmle.jpg

Carl Laemmle

  • January 1Lew Fields, American vaudeville performer (d. 1941)
  • January 6Takejirō Tokonami, Japanese politician, Home Minister, Railway Minister, and Minister of Communication (d. 1935)
  • January 8Emily Greene Balch, American writer and pacifist, recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize (d. 1961)
  • January 17Carl Laemmle, German-born film executive (d. 1939)
  • January 18Rubén Darío, Nicaraguan poet (d. 1916)
  • January 20Yvette Guilbert, French singer and actress (d. 1944)
  • January 25Adelaide Cabete, Portuguese women's rights activist (d. 1935)
  • January 21
    • Ludwig Thoma, German writer (d. 1921)
    • Maxime Weygand, French general (d. 1965)
  • January 29Carl L. Boeckmann, Norwegian-American artist (d. 1923)
  • February 3Charles Henry Turner, African American entomologist (d. 1923)
  • February 4Alexander Godley, British general (d. 1957)
  • February 7Laura Elizabeth Wilder, née Ingalls, American children's author (d. 1957)
  • February 8William Michael Crose, United States Navy Commander and the seventh Naval Governor of American Samoa (d. 1929)
  • February 21Otto Hermann Kahn, German-born millionaire and philanthropist (d. 1934)
  • February 27
    • Irving Fisher, American economist (d. 1947)
    • Nina Boucicault, English actress (first ever to play Peter Pan), daughter of Dion Boucicault (d. 1950)
    • Wilhelm Peterson-Berger, Swedish composer (d. 1942)
  • March 4Charles Pelot Summerall, American general (d. 1955)
  • March 6Samuel Cody, American aviation pioneer (k. 1913)
  • March 19Sakichi Toyoda, Japanese inventor and industrialist (d. 1930)
  • March 21Florenz Ziegfeld, Jr., American theatrical producer (d. 1932)
  • March 25Arturo Toscanini, Italian conductor (d. 1957)
  • March 29Cy Young, American baseball player (d. 1955)

April–June[]

File:Frank Lloyd Wright LC-USZ62-36384.jpg

Frank Lloyd Wright

  • April 2Eugen Sandow, German-born body builder and circus performer (d. 1925)
  • April 7Holger Pedersen, Danish linguist (d. 1953)
  • April 9Chris Watson, third Prime Minister of Australia (d. 1941)
  • April 10George William Russell, Irish nationalist, poet and artist (d. 1935)
  • April 11Mark Keppel, Superintendent of Los Angeles County Schools (d. 1928)
  • April 13Sammy Woods, English cricketer (d. 1931)
  • April 16
    • René Boylesve, French author (d. 1926)
    • Wilbur Wright, American aviation pioneer, co-inventor of the airplane with brother Orville (d. 1912)
  • April 23Johannes Andreas Grib Fibiger, Danish scientist, recipient of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine (d. 1928)
  • May 3J. T. Hearne, English cricketer (d. 1944)
  • May 7Władysław Reymont, Polish writer, Nobel Prize laureate (d. 1925)
  • May 14Kurt Eisner, German politician and publicist (d. 1919)
  • May 26Mary of Teck (d. 1953)
  • June 2William Goodenough, British admiral (d. 1945)
  • June 4Carl Gustaf Emil Mannerheim, President of Finland (d. 1951)
  • June 6David T. Abercrombie, American businessman and co-founder of Abercrombie & Fitch (d. 1931)
  • June 8Frank Lloyd Wright, American architect (d. 1959)
  • June 14Joseph John Englehart, American Northwest Frontier painter (d. 1915)
  • June 17Flora Finch, British-American silent film comedian (d. 1940)
  • June 24J. Gordon Edwards, American film director (d. 1925)
  • June 28Luigi Pirandello, Italian writer, Nobel Prize laureate (d. 1936)
  • June 30
    • Edward L. Beach, Sr., American naval officer and author (d. 1943)
    • Napoléon Turcot, Canadian politician (d. 1939)

July–September[]

  • July 8Käthe Kollwitz, German artist (d. 1945)
  • July 10Prince Maximilian of Baden, Chancellor of Germany (d. 1929)
  • July 25Alexander Rummler, American painter (d. 1959)
  • July 27Enrique Granados, Spanish composer (d. 1916)
  • July 28Charles Dillon Perrine, American-born astronomer (d. 1951)
  • July 31S.S. Kresge, American businessman and founder of Kmart (d. 1966)
  • August 3Stanley Baldwin, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom (d. 1947)
  • August 9
    • Charles Ballantyne, Canadian politician (d. 1950)
    • Evelina Haverfield British suffragette (d. 1920)
  • August 11Hobart Bosworth, American film actor, director, writer, and producer (d. 1943)
  • August 12Edith Hamilton, German-born educator and author (d. 1963)
  • August 14John Galsworthy, English writer, Nobel Prize laureate (d. 1933)
  • August 22Maximilian Bircher-Benner, Swiss physician and nutritionist (d. 1939)
  • August 28Umberto Giordano, Italian opera composer (d. 1948)
  • September 5Amy Beach American pianist and composer (d. 1944)
  • September 21Charles Bathurst, 1st Viscount Bledisloe, English politician, 4th Governor-General of New Zealand (d. 1958)

October–December[]

File:Marie Curie c1920.jpg

Marie Curie

Date unknown[]

  • Laura Anning Bell, artist (d. 1950)
  • Thomas Coward, ornithologist (d. 1933)
  • Sam Mussabini, athletics coach (d. 1927)
  • Elena Meissner, Romanian women's rights activist (d. 1940)
  • Zhang Haipeng, Chinese general (d. 1949)
  • probableScott Joplin, American musician and composer (d. 1917)[10]

Deaths[]

January–June[]

File:The Emperor Komei.jpg

Emperor Kōmei

  • January 14Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, French painter (b. 1780)
  • January 30Emperor Kōmei, 121st Emperor of Japan (b. 1831)
  • March 8Artemus Ward, American humorist (b. 1834) (tuberculosis)
  • March 25Friedlieb Ferdinand Runge, German chemist (b. 1795)
  • April 1Louis du Couret, French explorer, writer and military officer (b. 1812)
  • April 12David Canabarro, Gaúcho rebel revolutionary (b. 1796)
  • April 27Benjamin Hall, 1st Baron Llanover, after whom Big Ben may be named (b. 1802)
  • May 12Friedrich Wilhelm Eduard Gerhard, German archaeologist (b. 1795)
  • May 23William Crawshay II, industrialist (b. 1788)
  • May 29Margaretta Morris, American entomologist (d. 1797)
  • June 19 – Emperor Maximilian I of Mexico (executed) (b. 1832)

July–December[]

File:M Faraday Th Phillips oil 1842.jpg

Michael Faraday

  • July 26Otto of Greece, the first modern King of Greece (b. 1815)
  • July 31Benoît Fourneyron, French engineer and inventor of the turbine (b. 1802)
  • August 6David R. Porter, American politician (b. 1788)
  • August 8Maria Theresa of Austria, the second Queen consort of Ferdinand II of the Two Sicilies (b. 1816)
  • August 25Michael Faraday, English chemist and physicist (b. 1791)
  • August 31Charles Baudelaire, French writer (b. 1821)
  • September 10Simon Sechter, Austrian music teacher (b. 1788)
  • September 26James Ferguson, Scotland-born American astronomer (b. 1797)
  • October 9Ignacy Feliks Dobrzyński, composer (b. 1807)
  • October 23Franz Bopp, German linguist (b. 1791)
  • October 25Abuna Salama III, metropolitan of the Ethiopian Church
  • October 31William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, Irish astronomer (b. 1800)
  • November 19Ren Zhu, Chinese leader of the Nian Rebellion (b. 1830?)
  • December 1Filaret, Metropolitan of Moscow, Russian Orthodox leader (b. 1782)
  • December 10Sakamoto Ryōma, Japanese samurai, politician, and businessman (b. 1836)
  • December 26József Kossics, Catholic priest, writer, and ethnologist (b. 1788)
  • December 30Sarah Booth, English actress (b. 1793)
  • December 31 - Russell Crow's soul

References[]

  1. Demey, Thierry (1990). Bruxelles, chronique d’une capitale en chantier. 1. Brussels: Paul Legrain/C.F.C.-Editions.
  2. Moody, T. W.; Martin, F. X., eds. (1967). The Course of Irish History. Cork: Mercier Press. p. 370.
  3. "Alfred Nobel", Encyclopædia Britannica
  4. Schück, H.; Sohlman, R. (1929). The Life of Alfred Nobel. London: Heinemann. p. 101.
  5. "Constitution Act, 1867". Department of Justice (Canada). July 9, 2012. Retrieved August 14, 2012.
  6. Palmer, Alan; Veronica (1992). The Chronology of British History. London: Century Ltd. pp. 287–288. ISBN 0-7126-5616-2.
  7. Charity Vogel (November 30, 2007). "The Angola Train Wreck". American History. Retrieved October 29, 2013.
  8. Hessayon, D. G. The Rose Expert. Mohn Media Mohndrunk. p. 9.
  9. "La France: Hybrid Tea Rose". Archived from the original on September 21, 2009. Retrieved September 19, 2009. Unknown parameter |deadurl= ignored (|url-status= suggested) (help)
  10. "A Biography of Scott Joplin". The Scott Joplin International Ragtime Foundation. Archived from the original on February 24, 2007. Retrieved February 25, 2007. Unknown parameter |deadurl= ignored (|url-status= suggested) (help)
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